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Administration, Education, Leadership, Teaching, Technology

Killed by Caution: Modify as We Move Forward

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”  ~ T.S. Eliot

Privateer ship Lynx in Morro Bay, CA privateer-ship-lynx-morro-bay

flickr photo by mikebaird

We are all programmed to exercise a healthy amount of caution.  In many cases, thoughtful planning and preparation ensure that our time is used efficiently and that we don’t get ourselves–or others–into trouble.  This is especially true in education.  We write lesson plans, implement improvement plans, sit on committees, attend staff meetings, and develop policies.  A significant amount of our time is spent planning.

With that in mind, our world changes at such a rapid pace that if we spend too much time in preparation–developing detailed policies for everything we do–we are bound to fall behind. No place is this more apparent than in the realm of educational technology.  Many districts, and schools, are so concerned with the potential pitfalls of students utilizing technology that they invest countless hours developing policies that restrict student and teacher creativity.  In the process, our educational system falls further and further behind–widening the digital divide.  Don’t get me wrong, I am not advocating thoughtless action, but I do believe we sometimes need to take action with the understanding that things might not be perfect when we begin.  Innovation requires that we modify as we are moving forward. No waiting for politicians, or superheroes…let’s not be killed by caution.  Think on the run and make sure we keep our kids in the race.

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About azjd

Junior high principal by day, aspiring difference maker, and Jedi in my own mind. Act justly. Love mercy. Walk humbly.

Discussion

One thought on “Killed by Caution: Modify as We Move Forward

  1. “Overanalysis leads to paralysis” – learned that while in the Army. And sometimes that overanalysis is packaged as ‘thoughtful consideration,’ which provides an air of action, while actually preventing forward motion. Some people seem to enjoy that combination: look like they’re working hard, but are really stalling that which they either don’t like or can’t understand.

    Posted by Jeremy | November 27, 2010, 4:32 pm

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